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Author Topic: Ask The Weather Expert!  (Read 17053 times)

Offline Eric

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Re: Ask The Weather Expert!
« Reply #30 on: September 04, 2010, 10:06:33 AM »
A tropical depression has winds of 38 mph or less, and it's not named but only assigned a number.  A tropical storm has winds ranging from 39 to 73 mph, and it's strong enough to earn a name.  Both systems have to be tropical cyclones with well-defined centers and closed circulations at the surface.  They just can't be tropical waves that are only troughs of low pressure, which are not closed in circulation.  Hope that helps!

Worthy of a textbook!  Ever since I became interested in the weather in the late 1980s, tropical cyclones were, by far, my favorite area of study.  In fact, I would have become a meteorologist if I had... well... even the most elementary understanding of mathematics.

phw115wvwx

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Re: Ask The Weather Expert!
« Reply #31 on: September 05, 2010, 02:03:13 PM »
Worthy of a textbook!  Ever since I became interested in the weather in the late 1980s, tropical cyclones were, by far, my favorite area of study.  In fact, I would have become a meteorologist if I had... well... even the most elementary understanding of mathematics.
Thanks for the compliment!  I try my best with all these explanations to make it clear for you all who have not had advanced mathematics or physics but keep things scientifically accurate.  Math alone does wipe out about half of all incoming students in Meteorology as they don't realize how much it's needed to describe everything.

Offline Eric

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Re: Ask The Weather Expert!
« Reply #32 on: September 05, 2010, 03:38:05 PM »
Worthy of a textbook!  Ever since I became interested in the weather in the late 1980s, tropical cyclones were, by far, my favorite area of study.  In fact, I would have become a meteorologist if I had... well... even the most elementary understanding of mathematics.
Thanks for the compliment!  I try my best with all these explanations to make it clear for you all who have not had advanced mathematics or physics but keep things scientifically accurate.  Math alone does wipe out about half of all incoming students in Meteorology as they don't realize how much it's needed to describe everything.

That pesky math...  To this day, I'm still a little upset that I wasn't able to pursue meteorology as a career because my math skills are utterly terrible... on a good day.  But, life goes on, I suppose.

Offline TWCToday

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Re: Ask The Weather Expert!
« Reply #33 on: September 06, 2010, 12:28:07 PM »
What is weather? :P And I want my answer in song form!
Weather Dude Nick Walker (The video's owner prevents external embedding)

phw115wvwx

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Re: Ask The Weather Expert!
« Reply #34 on: September 07, 2010, 12:13:34 AM »
What is weather? :P And I want my answer in song form!
Where in the world do I even begin?  I'm going to pass on this one. :P

Offline Eric

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Re: Ask The Weather Expert!
« Reply #35 on: September 07, 2010, 01:07:25 AM »
What is weather? :P And I want my answer in song form!
Weather Dude Nick Walker


What are you asking him for?  I'm the poet here!   :wave:

Offline wxmediafan

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Re: Ask The Weather Expert!
« Reply #36 on: September 07, 2010, 09:23:20 AM »
I cannot believe that I haven't come across this thread before!  Great idea.

Back to the computer class and meteorology.  Yes, for my meteorology degree I am required to take computer programming, which I am currently enrolled in. 

I noticed earlier that Patrick had mentioned that many meteorology students decide not to follow through because of the math.  This was me circa 2009 :P.  My high school absolutely failed in preparing me for college.  I was so overwhelmed with my college algebra class that I just wanted to quite, because my advisor was throwing out Statisitcs and Trig and Calculus.  So, once I changed my major midway 1st semester last year, I quickly found out it was a horrible idea by the beginning of the next semester.  I got a job at a television station, and I got to experience the behind the scenes of making a forecast and presenting it on air, and I just got such a rush being able to see this happen, and I knew I couldn't give up my dream JUST because of math.  I told myself I'll get through it.  The Physics scared me as well.  Right now I am enrolled in Physics and Trig, and so far, so good. 

My advice:  DON'T give up just because of math.  It is very overwhelming at first, but if youtruly want it, you can have it :D
------

Anyway.. Tornadoes *generally*, if my minds serves me right, move in a northeast direction.  My guess of this is moving along the front if one is present.  Is his a good conclusion, or is there more?

phw115wvwx

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Re: Ask The Weather Expert!
« Reply #37 on: September 08, 2010, 12:41:17 AM »
If you really love weather and want a career in this field, your interest will help you prevail in these hard classes.  Many concepts may not make sense initially, but it'll change once you begin to connect the dots and apply everything you've learned to explain how the weather works.

Kyle, you have to account for the atmospheric flow at all levels from the large-scale winds aloft around fronts to the small-scale winds within the storm.  Your conclusion alone doesn't explain the fact that tornadoes can travel in any direction and even change directions suddenly while on the ground.  While it's true that tornadoes move from southwest to northeast most often, it's not something you should assume for all as the small-scale flow within a storm environment can vary dramatically and alter the tornado's path.

Offline toxictwister00

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Re: Ask The Weather Expert!
« Reply #38 on: September 08, 2010, 07:42:34 AM »
If you really love weather and want a career in this field, your interest will help you prevail in these hard classes.  Many concepts may not make sense initially, but it'll change once you begin to connect the dots and apply everything you've learned to explain how the weather works.

Kyle, you have to account for the atmospheric flow at all levels from the large-scale winds aloft around fronts to the small-scale winds within the storm.  Your conclusion alone doesn't explain the fact that tornadoes can travel in any direction and even change directions suddenly while on the ground.  While it's true that tornadoes move from southwest to northeast most often, it's not something you should assume for all as the small-scale flow within a storm environment can vary dramatically and alter the tornado's path.

That's true, I always assumed the samething, but the tornado that hit us went in the opposite direction, northwest to southeast. :yes:


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Offline Jonathon

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Re: Ask The Weather Expert!
« Reply #39 on: September 08, 2010, 07:46:54 PM »
What way do hurricanes move?

Offline Eric

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Re: Ask The Weather Expert!
« Reply #40 on: September 08, 2010, 08:58:56 PM »
What way do hurricanes move?

They move wherever the steering currents and wind patterns take them.

If you mean which way they rotate, tropical cyclones and all low pressure systems in the northern hemisphere rotate counterclockwise, and in the southern hemisphere - clockwise.

Offline Mr. Rainman

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Re: Ask The Weather Expert!
« Reply #41 on: September 22, 2010, 10:44:37 AM »
Hello, Patrick. I've got a question for you that I haven't been able to get a straight answer on for several months. My dream job is to work for the National Weather Service, specifically the Storm Prediction Center in Norman. However, these economic times have gotten me worried that finding a job anywhere for the National Weather Service will be tough. I graduate from college in the Spring of 2015. This leaves two questions.

1.) What do you think are the chances of finding a job with the NWS during this time period?
2.) Do you think University of North Dakota Grand Forks is a good meteorlogical school?

And, just because I'm slightly confused:

3.) I know the SPC issues various watches and warnings, but after they do, is it up to the local NWS offices whether to let the watches expire early or be extended?
Tiddlywinks.

phw115wvwx

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Re: Ask The Weather Expert!
« Reply #42 on: September 22, 2010, 04:26:06 PM »
Here's some answers that I hope will help you:

1)  It's not easy right now as it took me a year to land my NWS job after completing my Master's degree.  Meteorology is a really competitive field regardless of the economy, so you need good grades and skills outside of education that make your resume stand out in the job interview.  Seriously consider volunteering or internships with the NWS as that's how I was able to succeed.  You can also ask them about how to join a student program called SCEP where you apply to the NWS while you're still in college and become a part-time employee with priority over others in accepting a full-time job once you finish your degree.

2)  I haven't heard much about their program to really know, but I would think it's okay.  If you're seriously thinking about working for SPC, Oklahoma is your best choice as they specialize in severe weather.  You can always start at a different school like the one you mentioned and transfer there when ready.  You should talk to other people in the field for their opinions as well, and it would be wise to perform searches on all Meteorology schools within your geographical and financial limits.

3)  SPC makes the decisions on whether to let watches expire early or be extended.  However, you should know that SPC does contact all local NWS offices and asks them for their input on the situation.  So, even though SPC makes the final call, there is collaboration with this process.

Offline Mr. Rainman

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Re: Ask The Weather Expert!
« Reply #43 on: September 22, 2010, 04:38:50 PM »
You work for the NWS? What office and what is your position?
Tiddlywinks.

phw115wvwx

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Re: Ask The Weather Expert!
« Reply #44 on: September 22, 2010, 05:31:38 PM »
You work for the NWS? What office and what is your position?
I've sent you a PM with more information.  I want to keep this thread open to everyone for weather questions.  You can ask me more about personal stuff in a message.